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C/2007 F1 (LONEOS)

Orbit by Kazuo Kinoshita

Image of comet LONEOS on 2007 October 8
Copyright © 2007 by Michael Jäger and Gerald Rhemann (Austria)

Jager and G. Rhemann took this picture on 2007 October 8.15. The image was obtained using a 20-cm telescope and a CCD camera.

Discovery

B. A. Skiff (Lowell Observatory, Arizona, USA) found this object on images obtained using the 58-cm Schmidt telescope and a CCD camera on 2007 March 19.26. The discovery was made as part of the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth-Object Search (LONEOS). Skiff estimated the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 19.5. Confirmation was quick, as the comet was observed on March 19.47 by J. Young (Table Mountain Observatory, California, USA) and on March 19.54 by A. C. Gilmore (Mount John Observatory, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand). Young gave the total magnitude as 18.8.

Historical Highlights

  • A preliminary parabolic orbit was published by B. G. Marsden on March 21. He took 29 positions spanning the period of March 19 to 21 and determined a parabolic orbit with a perihelion date of 2007 November 3.29. The perihelion distance of 0.44 AU indicated the comet could become telescopic object in late October and early November. Several orbits calculated by Marsden during the next three weeks revealed some difficulty in pinpointing the perihelion date because of the comet's distance of over 3 AU from the sun. A revision on April 13, revealed a perihelion date of October 28.77 and a perihelion distance of 0.40 AU. This orbit proved to be an excellent representation of the comet's motion.
  • On April 5, A. Baransky (Kiev Comet Station, Lisnyky, Ukraine) imaged the comet using the 70-cm reflector and CCD camera and gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.3. He said the coma was 0.3' across. On the 7th and 8th, H. Rhoades and Young gave the total magnitude as 18.0. On the 11th and 16th, H. Denzau (Panker) imaged the comet using a 36-cm Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector and a CCD camera and gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.3. On April 15, J. Ticha and M. Tichy (Klet Observatory) imaged the comet using a 1.06-m reflector and a CCD camera and gave the magnitude as 18.5. On the 29th, Baransky imaged the comet using the 70-cm reflector and CCD camera and gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.2. He said the coma was 0.2' across. On April 30, B. Brinkman (Volkssternwarte Kirchheim) imaged the comet using a 0.5-m reflector and a CCD camera and gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.4.
  • On May 4, K. Kadota (Ageo, Saitama-ken, Japan) imaged the comet using a 25-cm reflector and a CCD camera and gave the total magnitude as 18.2. On the 8th, J.P.Navarro Pina (El Palmar, Murcia, Spain) imaged the comet using a 20-cm Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector and a CCD camera and gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 17.8-17.9. On the 10th, several observers operating the 45-cm reflector and CCD camera at Remanzacco, Italy, gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.3-18.4. On the 11th, Navarro Pina gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 16.0-17.0. On the 14th, On May 27, Navarro Pina gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 15.7-16.5.
  • The comet became very difficult to observe after May, but was still imaged at two observatories. On June 7, W. Hasubick (Buchloe, Germany) imaged the comet using a 44-cm reflector and a CCD camera and gave the total magnitude as 18.8. On July 7, L. Buzzi and F. Luppi (Schiaparelli Observatory) imaged the comet using a 60-cm reflector and a CCD camera. They gave the magnitude of the nuclear condensation as 18.7.
  • The comet was lost in twilight for the next two months. J. J. Gonzalez (Leon, Spain) tried to spot the comet on September 15.20 using his 20-cm reflector, but failed. He said the magnitude must have been less than magnitude 10.0. The comet was finally recovered on September 19.82, when Kadota imaged it through clouds (at low altitude and in twilight) using his 25-cm reflector and CCD camera. He estimated the magnitude as 10.6 and said the coma was 1.5' across. On the 20th, Gonzalez visually spotted the comet using his 20-cm reflector. The comet was then 6 degrees above the horizon in astronomical twilight. He gave the magnitude as 9.3 and said the coma was 2.5' across. On the 23rd, Gonzalez spotted the coemt at an altitude of 7 degrees in astronomical twilight using 25x100 binoculars. He gave the magnitude as 8.7 and noted the coma diameter was 4'. On September 24, Hasubick spottedd the comet using a 10-cm refractor. He gave the magnitude as 9.5 and the coma diameter as 3.0'.
  • Additional Images

    Image of comet LONEOS on 2007 September 21
    Copyright © 2007 by Mike Holloway (Holloway Comet Observatory, Van Buren, Arkansas, USA)

    M. Holloway took this picture on 2007 September 21. Using a 5-inch refractor and an ST10 CCD camera, he obtained six 30-second exposures to obtain this image. North is at the top and east is to the left.


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